W. Roessler

Calcutta

Calcutta

One of the earliest postcards of India, Calcutta, published by W. Rossler, a German or Austrian photographer in the city in 1897. Lithograph, Court sized, Printed in Austria. Undivided back.

Calcutta 1897

Calcutta 1897

Postmarked May 25, 1898 (?) and addressed to Master Leslie Hurst, 4 Waterlook Road, Nottingham, England: "My dear Leslie I have another p.c. [postcard] for you – Did you go to Gooe fair. It is your fair day today.

Calcutta

Calcutta

Kalighat - Burning Ghat - Nautch Girl - Kali
One of the earliest "Greetings from Calcutta" postcards, by the German or Austrian photographer Werner Roessler who was based in the city and had the lithographic card printed in Austria from his

Calcutta

Calcutta

[Original] Durga - Great Eastern Hotel - Telegraph Office - Snake Charmers [end]

A card from the earliest known series of Calcutta postcards by the Austrian photographer W.

Calcutta

Calcutta

An early view of Kolkata by one of its first postcard publishers. The fine detail and texture of the collotype can be seen even in how the individual telephone wires are visible.

Calcutta

Calcutta

Nautch dancers inspired stories like Hassan Shah’s The Nautch Girl, “the first known modern Indian novel” in the 1790s, as well as the first Urdu novel, the story of the Lucknow courtesan Umrao Jaan Ada in 1899.

A version of this card was sent by

Calcutta

Calcutta

A fourth card in Rossler’s 1897 lithographic series of Calcutta features a fakir, the male counterpoint to the nautch dancer. Above the fakir is his spiritual guide along lifelong wanderings, Lord Shiva.

Writer's Buildings

Writer's Buildings

The "Writer's Building" in then Calcutta is from where British India was governed from the later 1700s until 1857. "Writers" were recruits who came from England to make their fortunes with the British East India Company; some of them became

Subscribe to W. Roessler