M.V. Dhurandhar

Artist-signed postcards by M.V. Dhurandhar (1867-1944), one of the premiere painters and illustrators around the turn of the century. Dhurandhar became the first Indian head of the J.J. School of Arts and where he was employed throughout his career. Most of these color postcards are from 1903-1904, were halftones and printed in Germany by an unknown publisher. Other cards from later in the decade and thereafter were published by Lakshmi Art Printing Press, and others often for advertising purposes by a variety of publishers in India and as far as Zanzibar.

The Ayah

The Ayah

This postcard shows a nanny with a pram on the “Queen’s necklace” of Malabar beach in Bombay. The artist Dhurandhar and other fellow J.J.

Dhobi (Washerman)

Dhobi (Washerman)

Another evocative card by M.V. Dhurandhar injects personality into the roving washerman. In the background is an edifice of the "new" Bombay while in the foreground we see the age-old profession of washermen cleaning the resident's laundry.

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Shoe-lace Hawker

Shoe-lace Hawker

An early Dhurandhar postcard showing, as he was wont to do, the new types springing up in the city of Bombay as office workers and other people wearing Western shoes needed to replace their laces.

Fruit Seller

Fruit Seller

Note the rich character on this man's face in an image by M.V. Dhurandhar, one of India's most exceptional and prolific early 20th century painters and postcard artists.

Sent to Master E.

The Bombay Policeman

The Bombay Policeman

At the turn of the century, the uniformed policeman was a novel sight. Note the umbrella instead of gun or baton stick carried by this early policeman, drawn by M.V. Dhurandhar.

Postmarked May 14, 1903, Spencer’s Buildings.

Indian Water Lift

Indian Water Lift

Another small masterpiece of postcard design by M.V. Dhurandhar - the canopied tree, the rope diagonal and man supporting himself with it while drawing the eye down to the title.

This card was postmarked Oct.

Bombay Fisherman

Bombay Fisherman

For many of the artists in Bombay towards the end of the 19th century, fishermen and women were among the more striking inhabitants of the growing metropolis, visible on the long shorelines, sketched and painted frequently.

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